Can diabetes cause deafness?

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The elderly population is the largest increase in this trillion-dollar market. As the aging of the population accelerates, the probability of the elderly suffering from various diseases increases, and their health problems naturally become the focus of social attention.


Can diabetes cause deafness?

Long-term high blood sugar can cause damage to blood vessels and increase the risk of hearing loss. Blood sugar is thought to damage the nerves and tissues in the ear, disrupting the ability to hear. New research results show that compared with non-diabetic people, diabetic patients should be screened for hearing loss as early as possible to prevent various diseases such as depression and Alzheimer's disease caused by hearing loss.

There are many complications of diabetes, so after you get diabetes, you must treat it in time and control the increase in urine sugar. Diabetic patients may cause deafness, and diabetic patients may develop neuropathy. As high as 60% to 90%, it mainly affects the peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system, but can also affect the central nervous system. Many diabetic patients lose hearing unconsciously, and some suffer from sudden deafness. If metabolic ear disease is detected early, partial hearing can be preserved with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and acupuncture. It is recommended to wear a hearing aid as soon as possible once hearing loss occurs.


The National Institutes of Health found through a study of more than 11,000 people that people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop hearing loss as people without diabetes. Japanese researchers previously found that this condition is more common in young patients with diabetes. Researchers believe that when blood sugar levels are high, blood vessels in the ears may be damaged, thereby impairing hearing. Overall, the probability of hearing impairment in diabetic patients is 2.15 times higher than that of healthy people. Among them, the probability of hearing impairment in diabetic patients under 60 years old is 2.61 times that of healthy people of the same age, and the probability of hearing impairment in diabetic patients over 60 years old is 1.58 times higher.

The latest research by Chika Horikawa of Niigata University in Japan and colleagues found that even after factors such as aging and noise environment are taken into account, the incidence of hearing problems in diabetic patients is still more than twice that of healthy people without diabetes. Several studies have examined the link between diabetes and hearing loss, but the results have varied widely. These studies show a strong link between hearing loss and other conditions such as Alzheimer's and depression.

Chika Horikawa said that although the "relationship between hearing loss and diabetes" is controversial,Long-term high blood sugar can cause damage to blood vessels and increase the risk of hearing loss. Blood sugar is thought to damage the nerves and tissues in the ear, disrupting the ability to hear. New research results show that compared with non-diabetic people, diabetic patients should be screened for hearing loss as early as possible to prevent various diseases such as depression and Alzheimer's disease caused by hearing loss.


Warm reminder: Eating more foods containing zinc can lead to tinnitus and deafness in middle-aged and elderly people. There are many factors, and zinc deficiency is an important reason. The content of zinc in the cochlea is much higher than in other organs. The zinc content in the cochlea of ​​elderly people over 60 years old is significantly reduced, which affects the function of the cochlea and leads to hearing loss. You should eat more foods rich in zinc every day, such as fish, beef, chicken, eggs, various seafood, apples, oranges, walnuts, cucumbers, tomatoes, cabbage, radishes, etc.